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Art Resource Kits

Getting to know the arts is a vital component of any young person’s learning. In order for us to share the AGNS collection, and to reach out into our community, we have developed a series of art curriculum resource kits. These kits have been designed for early childhood educators throughout the province; we are confident that they will be helpful in your classroom. The kits include a text manual and a multitude of resources. The intent of the kits is to inspire you. Feel free to adapt the lessons. We hope some centres will develop their own teaching resources for the arts using the kits as a guide. We also want to hear from you.

Each lesson consists of information about a specific aspect of art making as related to an art work in the permanent collection of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. The reproductions of the various art works have been chosen to reflect the overall topic of the kit. Although the lessons are sequentially numbered, you may choose to start with the lesson which best suits the children's needs and interests. This is also true of the activities which follow each lesson. Please select lessons and activities that are most appropriate for your group.

The Kits:

Colour
This kit explores the diverse world of colour in art. Children are introduced to different ways that artists can use the elements of colour in their art work. "The Colour Manual", designed to be a flexible and adaptable guide for your use, includes several thematic lessons.

Line and Texture
This kit explores the use of line and texture in art. Children are introduced to different ways that artists can use the elements of line and texture in their art work. This manual, designed to be a flexible and adaptable guide for your use, includes several thematic lessons.

Sculpture
"The Sculpture Kit" explores the three dimensional world of sculpture. Children will be introduced to the elements of sculpture and learn about a variety of materials, tools and techniques artists use to make sculptural works. This manual, designed to be a flexible and adaptable guide for your use, includes several thematic lessons. (Kit # 2: Line and Texture is a good follow-up to the Sculpture Kit, as the concept of texture, introduced in the Sculpture Kit, is explored in detail.)

Shapes
This kit explores the use of shapes in art. Children are introduced to different ways that artists can use shapes as elements in their art work. This manual, designed to be a flexible and adaptable guide for your use, includes several thematic lessons.

NEW - Art and the Senses
"Art and the Senses" is the latest art kit developed by the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia in conjunction with the Department of Community Services and the early childhood education community. This kit explores how the senses help us understand more about our world and how artists apply this to their art work. This kit includes activities that can be adapted for children with various learning needs. 

ManualsThe manuals provide enough background for those who may not have training or experience with the arts or art education to deliver enriched art activities. For those who do have experience, please feel free to adapt and enhance the material.

The manual is a guide offering four lessons that explore the five senses: sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch. Your five senses play an important role in your daily life. Every moment in your life, you use at least one of your five senses. You see, hear, smell, taste and touch in order to adapt to a new environment. The five senses are important for everyone and the art activities in this manual will enrich all children’s sensory experiences.

NEW KIT Watercolour Monotype with lesson plan
AGNS ArtReach Lesson - Watercolour Monotype
Suggested Grade Levels:Grade levels 4-12 with different expectations.
Suggested Length of time:
Two Classes: 40-50 minutes each. The 2nd class could be shorter depending on how many rolling pins are being used and whether a second "ghost" print is taken and whether or not the resulting prints are to be shown and discussed.
Subject areas:
Any subject (Art, Social Studies, English, Biology, other). It could augment any subject in which depiction of an event or illustration is possible.
Rationale:
Watercolour monotype is easier to control than straight watercolour. Working on plexiglass means that one may use a drawing under the plexiglass as a guide. It introduces students to the idea of a print.
Logistics:
classroom set up: individual desks or small groups at a work table.
Materials:
1st Class: An 8 ½ x 11” plexiglass plate per child (may be re-used indefinitely), coarse sandpaper (# 50 -80), paper towels, watercolour paints, NOT acrylics, brushes, cotton swabs, gum arabic.
*Gum Arabic is optional if plates are well sanded. (It helps the paint stick to the plate and is supposed to help it release. It may be obtained in small quantities from many art supply stores.)
2nd Class: rolling pins with handles or firm brayers, old bath towels, water container large enough to wet paper, (could be a cat litter box, large dishpan, etc.) copier paper.
Suggested Outcomes:
It introduces the idea of a matrix from which to make prints and shows the reversal common to many kinds of printmaking.
Introduction:
I believe watercolour monotype is a recent form of monotype, earlier examples being in printers' ink or oil paint.
Procedure:
1st Class
The plexiglass must be sanded vertically, horizontally, and from each corner. (The teacher might do this for younger students.) (It need not be repeated with re-use of the plate unless the watercolour will not stay where drawn.)
Puddle about a teaspoon of gum arabic on the plate, spread it evenly with paper towels over the whole plate, and buff it down until it is not sticky. (This step may be omitted if the plate is well sanded.)
If desired, tape a drawing to the underside of the plate.
Paint, letting adjacent areas dry before painting next to them. Students might like to experiment with both washes and fully charged colour.
Let paint dry completely.
2nd Class
Draw paper through the water.
Blot it between two towels. (If the paper is too wet the paint will run. If too dry it will not pick up the paint well and you should try again, blotting less).
Place on the plexiglass and, with the rolling pin or brayer, make 6 or more passes with pressure over the plate.
Carefully lift the paper from one side. (Thick paint may make the paper want to stick.)
Note:
For young children this might be a simple manipulation of paint and colour. For older children it could be used with any drawing they have made (not too detailed) or with a computer image. This medium encourages shape awareness but not detail.
Developed by Cecil Day